Twin supercomputers to help meteorologists

The National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration recently announced it has two new supercomputers that will aid weather and climate predictions. One of the key team members who developed the dual supercomputers spoke to KOCO 5 about the benefits for meteorologists.|MORE| Predicting our future: OU storm research team embarks on 2-year field study “The potential for a triple improvement is really huge,” Brian Gross said. “That’s a significant improvement in our game.” One of the supercomputers is in Virginia and the other in Arizona. The computers replaced the previous ones and got a major upgrade with more storage space and better computing capacity. “It would take about a month for the entire population of Earth to do what both our computers can do in one second,” said David Michaud. The supercomputers are among the 50 fastest in the world. The new configurations provide enhanced weather model data that will be available to meteorologists across the country, including that of KOCO 5. single-run deterministic records to ensemble-based operational applications,” Gross said. That kind of weather data gives meteorologists multiple forecasts and versions, allowing the accuracy of forecasts will improve.The supercomputers will also enable meteorologists to develop a new hurricane forecasting model, the global forecasting systems and increase the resolution of the model data.|MORE| Predicting our future: severe weather events” So a warning here – this will all be based on are on whether or not models can outperform the current system,” Gross said. “They need to be able to do that before we deploy them.” While the twin supercomputers are already up and running, the new upgrades won’t be until the summer of 2023 and subsequently implemented in 2024.

The National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration recently announced it has two new supercomputers that will aid weather and climate forecasting.

One of the key team members who developed the dual supercomputers spoke to KOCO 5 about the benefits for meteorologists.

|MORE| Predicting our future: OU storm research team sets out for 2-year field study

“The potential for a threefold improvement is really huge,” said Brian Gross. “That’s a substantial improvement in our game.”

One of the supercomputers is in Virginia and the other in Arizona. The computers replaced the previous ones and got a major upgrade with more storage space and better computing power.

“It would take about a month for the entire population of Earth to do what both our computers can do in one second,” said David Michaud.

The supercomputers are among the 50 fastest in the world. The new configurations provide enhanced weather model data that will be available to meteorologists across the country, including that from KOCO 5.

“I think the really big innovation that we’re looking for with this increased computing capability is our ability to move from sort of single-run deterministic modest to ensemble-based operational applications,” Gross said.

That kind of weather data gives meteorologists multiple forecasts and versions, improving the accuracy of forecasts.

The supercomputers will also enable meteorologists to develop a new hurricane forecasting model, upgrade global forecasting systems and increase the resolution of the model data.

|MORE| Predicting our future: severe weather influences

“So a caveat here — this will all be based on whether or not models can outperform the current system,” Gross said. “They need to be able to do that before we implement them.”

While the twin supercomputers are already up and running, the new upgrades won’t roll out until summer 2023 and then into 2024.

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